How To Build Muscle In 4 Steps

How To Build Muscle In 4 Steps

How do I build muscle is a question asked by thousands of beginning bodybuilders every year. There is a lot of information out there, but it is not all accurate. The body building world can be intimidating for a beginner, so here we will answer the basic question “How do I build muscle?”

Step 1
What you need to do first off to answer the how do I build muscle question is learn the correct techniques for a weight training system. There is no need to over complicate matters at the start, just make sure that you have a routine that puts a stress on the muscles to allow them to develop, and that you can sustain the routine consistently. Although a long term bodybuilder will need a more diverse routine to build muscles evenly, that is for a later time, and the basic routines will do for now.

Step 2
What you do need to do is give the same attention to different parts of your body. Many people who ask how do I build muscle are concentrating too much on one small group of muscles. The body has many different groups of muscles, and if you can learn to work them evenly, you will get much better results. The most common group for people to concentrate on is the biceps, but this is not the way to go for optimum results.

Step 3
Do everything you can to avoid injury. One non-answer to how do I build muscle is to be injured so that your workout routines cannot be maintained. The important consideration is not to attempt too much too soon. A simple muscle strain will not be too damaging, provided you rest it, but a ligament strain will put a severe block on your progress. One of the most important parts of any athletic routine is the warm up, and that should never be overlooked. Make sure you wind down properly by doing some stretching as well.

Step 4
Listen to your body, and know when you are not getting the result you want. Experienced bodybuilders can recognise the feeling known as the burn, which is a symptom of the muscle being worked effectively for health and growth. If you want to know how do I build muscle, make sure you take notice of how your body feels the next day. The muscles should not be strained, but they should be aching the next morning if you have been working them at the level you need to.

These four answers are all parts of learning “how do I build muscle?”

Technique in Weight Training

Technique in Weight Training

Technique in weight training is very important for achieving the expected progress, but also for protecting the body of the sportsman. The first important thing is to learn correctly the basic movements.

In this type of training there is a kind of classic set of exercises, which the sportsman needs to master from the beginning. This set includes exercises with free weights (dumbbells and barbells). While training with these, the movement is not imposed by any machine. When executed without the supervision of a fitness instructor, it is possible that these movements are done in a wrong way, a situation which increases the risk of accidents a lot.

One of the most frequent mistakes is an incorrect position of the spine. Some exercises (bench press, barbell curls) could involve exaggerated arching, while others (sit up bend, dead lift, squats, etc.) involve unjustified flexing (hunching).

These wrong positions can lead to unfavourable stress exerted over the spine, knees or shoulders. Besides, they can direct the effort to other groups of muscles than the ones intended. The result is that none of these are properly trained, because no exercises specific to the muscles are performed correctly. In such situations, the sportsman will only feel exhaustion in all his body and will not be able to direct and localize the effort in the zone which a particular exercise should mobilize.

Another example of wrong technique is exaggerated swinging for exercises which do not need impetus. This happens most often while raising the weights laterally for working on the deltoid muscles, when the sportsman wrongly flexes the knees and uses the lumbar muscles, arching his back too much.

Other mistakes are made when catching the bars. In the case of pull up, for example, and of pushing from behind the neck (for the shoulders), a too narrow catch will place the scapular-humeral circulation into a non-physiological, stressing position. Exaggerated bending forward during squat will force the spine, while lowering the thighs below horizontal position will stress the menisci.

Rowing from bending position and stretching back must be done with the back in extension; otherwise the risk of slipped disc might appear. Not using a belt when lifting very heavy weights can determine slipped disc, but also inguinal hernia or rupture of abdominal muscles.

The technique of breathing must be understood correctly. Breathing in instead of breathing out, blocking the thorax or not can affect the sportsman a lot. Generally, the sportsman must breathe out during the most difficult part of the movement and must breathe in during controlled coming back in position. Apnoea (blocking of the thorax) must be used only in the case of lifting heavy and very heavy weights; otherwise it is not justified. While making aerobic effort, it is necessary to have a particular breathing rhythm, a pace which can vary according to the cardiac frequency and lung ventilation.

All these examples support the idea that the presence of the fitness instructor during training is absolutely necessary.